Monday, October 20, 2008

A Book in the Hand...

Winging its way in today, from the far side of the planet ... the first copy! Now published, A Field Guide to Melancholy, featuring the photographs of Laurence Aberhart, the master of melancholy.


A profound experience. The journey into print, thrilling, daunting. And now, here it is, complete with 'new book' smell, divine.

15 comments:

Dylan Trigg said...

Marvellous news! Well done, Jacky! The book looks great. I pre-ordered mine about a month ago, so hopefully it should arrive soon!

jacky bowring said...

Thanks Dylan ... it's a strange feeling, of all those pages and scribbles now assembled into a very sturdy book! Now got to get on with the next one ...

EMG said...

That is wonderful to see -- it may take a bit longer to get to the US, but I'm looking forward to reading this in November or December (I'll pay to have it sent over from the UK)...

jacky bowring said...

I hope you enjoy it ... Melancholia [the film] gets a special mention ...[if I'm talking to who I think I'm talking to here?!]...

EMG said...

Yes, that's me!

Fido the Yak said...

Splendid, Jacky!

My Amazon account says I still have to wait a while.

Funny thing. We watched La Notte last night and I found myself wondering when your book was coming out. Cheers!

jacky bowring said...

Thanks FTY ... Hmm, I'm not sure how the book is disseminated into the world, I imagine a small paddle steamer may take them across the Atlantic, so if you're an American Amazonian there is a bit more of a delay.
And La Notte ... Antonioni -- Signor Noia himself-- features in the "Blue Guide" section ...
[And great to know you ARE who I think you are, EMG!]

DBL said...

Congratulations, Jacky. Perfect for the season's turn, up here to darker colder days of strange light: cannot wait until my copy arrives, by paddleboat, canoe, or lovingly held in an owl's beak...

jacky bowring said...

Thanks DBL - the owls are on overtime. The season's turn, ah yes ... here to the green and leafy, voluptuous.
The tome is indeed more in time with autumnal moments ...

D.Coys said...

Like the synopsis. I always thought Emos were teenagers working on the frontiers of what constitutes 'rights' and their 'abuse'.
Ha ha! Anyway, it's on my list, and - congratulations! Hope the pleasure in placing the volume on a shelf and admiring it doesn't eventually bring on post-publishing melancholy!

jacky bowring said...

Thanks DeCoys ... and, indeed, the drift into the ennui of post-publishing threatens. Fortunately The Sequel is never far from my mind and will ensure the aversion of atrophy ...

SAM RENSEIW said...

congratualations! a fine book indeed.. ordered it after reading about it at side- effects, and just finished it yesterday. a pleasure. thanks.
best ,sam renseiw

jacky bowring said...

Thanks Sam, so glad you enjoyed it! Just took a peek at your site and delighted to see psychogeography in consort with melancholy, as it was a book on the former which inspired one on the latter. (Merlin Coverly's Psychogeography).

Anonymous said...

Hi, I am the girl who is writing an essay about happiness, if you remember the dissertation presentation you attended at the bartlett. I managed to borrow the book from Ian, since the copies at our library have not arrived yet, and do have to say that am really enjoying reading it. I am nearly finished reading it and you are really convincing me of the importance of melancholy and that sadness is as important to happiness for our 'wellbeing'. However this is not good news for me, since I am trying to prove the opposite in my dissertation. anyways just wanted to say thank you, it has been a real eye opener.
keti

jacky bowring said...

Hi Keti- glad to hear you got hold of a copy of the book. But remember, happiness is ALSO important for wellbeing ... the main point of writing about melancholy was to keep alive the need for darkness as well as the light and bright side of life. Which is really what we discussed after your presentation, to find that balance - so don't give up on happiness!! Best of luck with your dissertation, Jacky